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Plan for the issuance of permits

GAZODUQ PROJECT

July 17, 2020

Contents

1. Introduction

On January 22, 2020, the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada (the Agency) determined that an impact assessment is required for the Gazoduq Project (the project) pursuant to subsection 16(1) of the Impact Assessment Act (IAA).

This permitting plan was developed by the Agency to outline the permits, licences and authorizations (regulatory instruments) that may be required for the project should the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change issue a decision statement to the proponent with enforceable conditions to allow the project to proceed. The permits, licences and authorizations described below are related to powers, duties or functions from federal authorities. It should be noted that permits, licences and authorizations required at the provincial and municipal level are not described in this document.

The Agency may revise this permitting plan during the impact assessment process in response to new information or advice from the proponent, regulators, jurisdictions or other participants in the process, and in order to accommodate any changes with respect to the project that may occur during the assessment.

2. Project Description

Gazoduq Inc. is proposing the construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline approximately 780 kilometres long between northeastern Ontario and Saguenay, Quebec. This proposed project would connect TC Energy Limited's existing main natural gas transmission system in northeastern Ontario to the proposed Énergie Saguenay Project, a natural gas liquefaction facility by GNL Québec in Saguenay, Québec. The project would also include three compressor stations, one metering station, approximately 25 block valves and a dedicated control centre.

3. Required Regulatory Instruments Identification and Justification

According to the detailed project description submitted to the Agency by the proponent on January 12, 2020, four regulatory instruments may be required for the project should the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change issue a decision statement to the proponent allowing the project to proceed.

The following regulatory instruments may be required for the project:

Authorizations under the Canadian Energy Regulator Act

As an interprovincial pipeline, the project is subject to the requirements under the Canadian Energy Regulator Act (CER Act) and its regulations.

Authorization under paragraphs 34.4(2)(b) and 35(2)(b) of the Fisheries Act

An authorization under paragraphs 34.4(2)(b) and 35(2)(b) of the Fisheries Act may be required for proposed works, undertakings or activities that could result in the death of fish or harmful alteration, disruption or destruction of fish habitat.

Permit under subsection 73(1) of the Species at Risk Act

A permit under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) may be required if the proposed project can affect wildlife species at risk listed on Schedule 1 of the Act, as an endangered, threatened or extirpated species or on any element of their critical habitat or the residence of their individuals in a manner that is prohibited under subsection 32(1), section 33 and subsection 58(1) of the Act. However, the detailed project description does not currently include sufficient information, particularly with respect to the planned crossing methods and watercourses considered, to determine whether an approval would be required.

Licences for Explosive Factories and Magazines under subsection 7(1) of the Explosives Act

Facilities for manufacturing and storing explosives that are proposed on sites located along the project corridor are subject to the requirements of the Explosives Act and its regulations. The issuance of permits for storing explosives may fall under federal (Natural Resources Canada) or provincial jurisdiction.

4. Information on Required Regulatory Instruments

4.1 Authorizations under the Canadian Energy Regulator Act

4.1.1 Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for Pipelines

As an interprovincial pipeline, the project is subject to the requirements under the Canadian Energy Regulator Act (CER Act) and its regulationsFootnote1.

Per section 185 of the CER Act, the proponent must be granted a certificate of public convenience and necessity (certificate) under section 183 of the CER Act in order to construct and operate the project. The Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines contain the information that the proponent must provide in relation to the certificate. The assessment will be conducted by a review panel through a single, integrated process led by the Agency. The panel will have at least one Commissioner from the Canada Energy Regulator (CER) appointed to it. Once the review panel has completed its assessment, it will prepare a report containing, among other things, a recommendation to the Governor in Council whether the certificate should be issued. If the Governor in Council directs the CER's Commission to issue the certificate, the CER will regulate the project throughout its lifecycle. More information on the CER's lifecycle regulation is found under section 4.1.2.

Depending on the proponent's plans, it may apply for other authorizations under the CER Act either separately to the CER or as part of the single, integrated review process with the Agency. Examples of these authorizations include:

  • Tolls and tariffs, or on a tolling methodology (sections 225-240 of the CER Act)
  • An exemption order (section 214 of the CER Act)
  • A right of entry order (sections 324-326 of the CER Act)
  • The purchase, sale, lease, amalgamation or transfer of a pipeline or abandoned pipeline (section 181 of the CER Act)

However, exactly which approvals will be required and when depends on the details of the project and the proponent's needs. The proponent should make clear which authorization it is requesting when it submits its Impact Statement to the Agency or its application to the CER. It is recommended that companies consult Section 3.1 of the CER's Filing Manual: Action Sought by Applicant, for further instructions.

4.1.2 Lifecycle Regulation

If the project is approved, the CER would be the lead regulator for the rest of the project's lifecycle and would be solely responsible for authorizations under the CER Act. The CER's Commission is responsible for making independent regulatory decisions under the CER Act and regulations.

After the proponent receives its certificate from the CER's Commission, it must seek approval for the detailed route of the project under sections 201-210 of the CER Act. It must prepare plans for the projected detailed route of the pipeline and notify landowners of the detailed route. The CER's Commission may hold a hearing on the detailed route, subject to section 202 of the CER Act. The proponent will also have to proceed with the detailed project design, and could be required to undertake additional studies, draw up plans or satisfy other requirements according to the CER's conditions on any certificate or any related order.

A certificate or other CER authorization can have conditions attached to it. The conditions can be associated with different phases in the pipeline lifecycle e.g. those that must be complied with before construction, those that must be complied with during construction and post construction, and those that must be complied with during the operation and maintenance phase. Some conditions impose requirements for the last phase of the lifecycle, that is, the abandonment phase. One example of the latter is a requirement for a proponent to have mechanisms in place that will provide adequate funds to pay for future abandonment. The proponent will have to comply with any conditions attached to its authorization. The CER's specialists will review all the filings related to the conditions. Certain conditions must be approved by the CER's Commission before the project can proceed.

Throughout the lifecycle of an approved project, the CER holds the proponent responsible for satisfying its regulatory requirements so that it operates and maintains pipelines and facilities safely and protects people, property and the environment. For this purpose, the CER:

  • reviews and assesses the filings related to conditions;
  • tracks conditions to verify compliance;
  • verifies compliance with regulatory requirements and legislation; and
  • conducts compliance verification activities, such as inspections and audits, to promote safety and security, environmental protection, emergency management, damage prevention and to deter future non-compliant behaviours.

Once construction is completed, and in the case of a certificate, the proponent will require the CER's authorization to start operating, which is also known as a "leave to open" authorization under section 213 of the CER Act. This leave is necessary so that the CER's Commission can satisfy itself that the pipeline may be safely opened for transmission. As well, as mentioned earlier, certain conditions may be required to be met before the start of operation or in the first few months or years of operation of the pipeline. Throughout the pipeline's lifecycle, the proponent must continue to comply with the Canadian Energy Regulator Onshore Pipeline Regulations (OPR) and the other regulatory requirements in order to operate the pipeline safely and protect the environment.

The companies regulated by the CER must, pursuant to the OPR, have management systems in place, including for safety, security, damage prevention, emergency management and environmental protection. In case of an incident, the CER can inquire into the accident and can hold the proponent responsible for corrective actions and cleanup. If a proponent wanted to vary its certificate or vary the route of the pipeline, it would need to apply to the CER for approval from the CER's Commission under sections 190 and 211, respectively.

When a proponent who owns a pipeline wants to stop operating part or all of it, the company must inform the CER. The proponent might apply to deactivate (section 44 of the OPR), decommission (section 45.1 of the OPR), or abandon (section 241 of the CER Act) the pipeline. The CER's Commission may hold a hearing (subject to subsection 241(3)) in relation to an application to abandon a pipeline. The proponent must demonstrate that it will abandon the pipeline in a way that protects the environment and the public and that the company will anticipate, prevent, manage and mitigate any potentially dangerous conditions associated with its pipeline.

If the CER's Commission allows abandonment of a pipeline or a section of it, it issues an order that usually includes conditions that must be met before abandonment is complete. The CER verifies that conditions or other legal requirements are met through its review of submissions, site-inspections, and audits. If the pipeline is abandoned by removal, CER oversight ends after all conditions in the order are satisfied. If a pipeline is abandoned in place, the CER continues to have oversight.

4.1.3 References

Canadian Energy Regulator Act (S.C. 2019, c. 28, s. 10)
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-7/

Canadian Energy Regulator Onshore Pipeline Regulations
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-99-294/index.html

The CER's Lifecycle Approach to Protecting the Environment
https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/sftnvrnmnt/nvrnmnt/lfcclpprch/index-eng.html

Canada Energy Regulator Filing Manual
https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/bts/ctrg/gnnb/flngmnl/index-eng.html

4.1.4 Contact Information

For more detailed guidance on a certificate application, contact the CER:

Canada Energy Regulator
Suite 210, 517 Tenth Avenue SW
Calgary AB T2R 0A8
Telephone: 403-292-4800
Toll free: 1-800-899-1265

4.2 Authorization under paragraphs 34.4(2)(b) and 35(2)(b) of the Fisheries Act

4.2.1 Description

This authorization is the responsibility of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO).

Subsection 34.4(1) of the Fisheries Act prohibits the carrying on of any work, undertaking or activity, other than fishing, that results in the death of fish. Under paragraph 34.4(2)(b) of the Fisheries Act, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans may issue an authorization with conditions relating to the carrying on of the work, undertaking or activity that result in death of fish.

Subsection 35(1) of the Fisheries Act prohibits carrying on any work, undertaking or activity that results in the harmful alteration, disruption or destruction of fish habitat. However, under paragraph 35(2)(b) of the Fisheries Act, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans may grant a permit with conditions relating to the carrying on of the work, undertaking or activity that results in the harmful alteration, disruption or destruction of fish habitat.

4.2.2 Regulatory Process

The Fish and Fish Habitat Protection Program from DFO ensures compliance with the provisions of the Fisheries Act and the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The program considers any proposed work, undertaking or activity that may result in adverse effects on the fish and its habitat.

It is recommended to submit a request of project review to DFO using the Request for Review form. This form must be submitted to the following email address: habitat-qc@dfo-mpo.gc.ca.

An authorization will be required if DFO considers that the project may result in the death of fish or in harmful alteration, disruption or destruction of fish habitat. For more details on the process for requesting an authorization, the proponent is invited to consult the following section of the DFO website, in the tab Projects near water: Request a review of your project near water: Step 5. Apply for project authorization.

It should be noted that the new provisions of the Fisheries Act regarding the protection of the fish and its habitat came into force on August 28, 2019. The proponent is invited to consult the Projects near water website in order to be aware of the changes made and ensure compliance of the project with the new provisions of the modified Act.

A permit under subsection 73(1) of SARA may be required from DFO if the proposed project can affect aquatic species at risk listed on Schedule 1 of the Act or on any element of their critical habitat or the residence of their individuals in a manner that is prohibited under subsection 32(1), section 33 and subsection 58(1) of the Act. Refer to section 4.3.2.2 for details.

For any additional questions on the processes for requesting a review and an authorization to DFO, please contact the DFO regional office by phone at 1-877-722-4828 or by email at habitat-qc@dfo-mpo.gc.ca.

4.2.3 References

Fisheries Act, R.S.C. 1985, c F-14
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-14/

Authorizations Concerning Fish and Fish Habitat Protection Regulations: SOR/2019-286
http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2019/2019-08-21/html/sor-dors286-eng.html

Applicant's Guide to Support the Authorizations Concerning Fish and Fish Habitat Protection Regulations
http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pnw-ppe/reviews-revues/applicants-guide-candidats-eng.html

Permits Authorizing an Activity Affecting Listed Wildlife Species Regulations
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/PDF/SOR-2013-140.pdf

Request a review of your project near water
http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pnw-ppe/reviews-revues/request-review-demande-d-examen-001-eng.html

4.2.4 Contact Information

For more detailed guidance on this authorization, please contact the relevant DFO regional office in Quebec:

Fish and Fish Habitat Protection Program
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
850 route de la Mer
P.O. Box 1000
Mont-Joli QC G5H 3Z4
Fax: 418-775-0658
Telephone: 1-877-722-4828
Email: habitat-qc@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

4.3 Permit under subsection 73(1) of the Species at Risk Act

4.3.1 Description

Permits are required by those persons conducting activities affecting wildlife species listed on Schedule 1 of SARA as extirpated, endangered, or threatened and which contravene the Act's general prohibitions where they are in force.

4.3.1.1 General Prohibitions

Pursuant to sections 32 and 33 of SARA, it is prohibited to:

  • kill, harm, harass, capture or take an individual of a wildlife species listed under SARA as extirpated, endangered or threatened;
  • possess, collect, buy, sell or trade an individual of a wildlife species listed under SARA as extirpated, endangered or threatened, or any part or derivative of such an individual;
  • damage or destroy the residence of one or more individuals of a wildlife species listed under SARA as endangered or threatened, or of a wildlife species listed under SARA as extirpated if a recovery strategy has recommended its reintroduction into the wild in Canada.

The general prohibitions apply to:

  • listed federal species that are aquatic species or migratory birds protected by the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, everywhere in Canada;
  • other listed federal species where found on federal land.

Under sections 34 and 80 of SARA, general prohibitions may apply on lands other than federal lands for species that are not aquatic species or migratory birds protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994.

4.3.1.2 Prohibitions Related to Critical Habitat

Under subsections 58(1) and 61(1) of SARA, no person shall destroy any part of the critical habitat of any listed endangered species or of any listed threatened species — or of any listed extirpated species if a recovery strategy has recommended the reintroduction of the species into the wild in Canada. These restrictions apply if they are triggered by a number of factors, including:

  • the species is an aquatic species;
  • the species is a migratory bird protected by the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994;
  • the critical habitat (for species that are not aquatic species or migratory bird species) is on federal land, in the exclusive economic zone of Canada or on the continental shelf of Canada.

Under section 61 of SARA, restrictions relative to critical habitat may apply on non-federal lands under an Order in Council.

4.3.1.3 Applicable Situations

Under section 73, the competent minister may enter into an agreement or issue a permit authorizing a person to engage in an activity affecting any listed endangered, threatened or extirpated species, any part of its critical habitat, or the residences of its individuals, if the proposed activity falls under one or more of the following situations:

  • the activity is scientific research relating to the conservation of the species and conducted by qualified persons;
  • the activity benefits the species or is required to enhance its chance of survival in the wild;
  • affecting the species is incidental to the carrying out of the activity.
4.3.1.4 Responsibilities

Responsibility for implementing SARA in Canada lies with the Ministers responsible for DFO, Parks Canada Agency (PCA) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC).

  • DFO is responsible for considering permit applications with respect to aquatic species (as defined by SARA), other than individuals of species in the waters situated on federal lands administered by the PCA. An "aquatic species" under SARA includes:
    • fish, shellfish, crustaceans and marine animals including any parts thereof;
    • all of their life stages, such as eggs, sperm, spawn, larvae, spat and juvenile stages of fish; and
    • marine plants, including all benthic and detached algae, marine flowering plants, brown algae, red algae, green algae and phytoplankton.
  • PCA is responsible for considering permit applications with respect to individuals in or on federal lands administered by the Agency, including aquatic species (as defined by SARA) as well as terrestrial species.
  • ECCC is responsible for considering permit applications with respect to all individuals that are not under the responsibility of PCA or DFO. This includes for all terrestrial species on federal land and any land affected by a SARA protection order issued under subsection 34(2) of SARA, and for migratory birds wherever they are found.

If a competent department issues an authorization, licence or permit under another federal Act, authorizing a person or organization to engage in an activity affecting listed wildlife species, any part of its critical habitat or the residences of its individuals, this authorization, licence or permit can act as a SARA permit, provided that the pre-conditions described under subsection 73(3) of SARA are met.

4.3.2 Regulatory Process

4.3.2.1 Application Submission for a Terrestrial Species at Risk

To obtain a permit from ECCC, proponents must submit an application using the Species at risk permit system found on the Species at risk public registry and provide the required information detailed in the application.

4.3.2.2 Application Submission for an Aquatic Species at Risk

To seek a permit under SARA from DFO, the proponent must submit an application to the relevant regional office of the Fish and Fish Habitat Protection Program (refer to section 4.2.4 for contact information). The timing of when the application is submitted is determined by the proponent. If the proponent is also seeking a Fisheries Act Authorization, the process to apply for a SARA permit can be combined with the process to seek a Fisheries Act Authorization.

4.3.2.3 Application Analysis and Consultation

An analysis of the application is conducted by ECCC, PCA, or DFO upon receipt of the application, although there may be occasions when the competent minister will require additional information. A focus of the analysis is on how the application meets the pre-conditions listed under subsection 73(3). Authorizations may be issued only if the competent minister is of the opinion that all three of the following pre-conditions are met:

  • all reasonable alternatives to the activity that would reduce the impact on the species have been considered and the best solution has been adopted;
  • all feasible measures will be taken to minimize the impact of the activity on the species or its critical habitat or the residences of its individuals;
  • the activity will not jeopardize the survival or recovery of the species.

During this analysis stage, and before the regulatory decision, ECCC, PCA or DFO may undertake additional Indigenous consultations, as required under subsections 73(4) and (5) of SARA.

4.3.2.4 Regulatory Decision

The Permits Authorizing an Activity Affecting Listed Wildlife Species Regulations specify that the competent minister must issue a permit or notify the applicant that the permit has been refused within 90 days following the receipt of the application. This time limit is suspended if the application is incomplete and the applicant is notified. The time limit suspension ends when all the information is received from the applicant.

The Regulations also specify that the 90-day time limit does not apply in the following circumstances:

  • additional consultations are necessary, including consultations with wildlife management boards and bands under the Indian Act which are required by subsections 73(4) and (5) of SARA;
  • another Act of Parliament or land claims agreement requires that a decision be made before the competent minister issues or refuses to issue a permit;
  • the terms and conditions of a permit previously issued to the applicant have not been met;
  • the applicant requests or agrees that the time limit not apply; or
  • the activity described in the permit application is modified before the permit is issued or refused.

For activities requiring a decision under the IAA, permit applications are not subject to the 90-day timeline because another Act of Parliament requires that a decision be made before the competent minister issues or refuses to issue a SARA permit. These applications can be reviewed concurrently with the impact assessment to facilitate alignment of the authorization securing processes.

If wildlife or vegetation surveys are necessary to obtain more baseline information about SARA listed species at risk that may be impacted by a project, SARA permits may be required if these surveys affect individuals of species, their residence or critical habitat (for example, if they require capture, handling, fencing, baiting, disturbing of normal behaviour). Permit applications for these wildlife or vegetation surveys would be subject to the 90-day timeline.

It is the proponent's responsibility to identify and carry out all species at risk surveys necessary to support the permit application and review, and to monitor for additional species being listed during the planning of their project. Proponents are invited to consult early with the ECCC, PCA and DFO regional offices on survey plans.

4.3.3 References

Species at Risk Act, S.C. 2002, c. 29
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/S-15.3/

Permits Authorizing an Activity Affecting Listed Wildlife Species Regulations
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2013-140/index.html

Permitting under the Species at Risk Act
https://wildlife-species.canada.ca/SPLEP-SARAPS/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.main&

Species at Risk Public Registry
https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/species-risk-public-registry.html

Guidelines for permitting under section 73 of Species at Risk Act.
https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/species-risk-public-registry/policies-guidelines/permitting-under-section-73.html

4.3.4 Contact Information

For more detailed guidance on permits for terrestrial species at risk, please contact the Canadian Wildlife Service:

Quebec Region

Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
801-1550 d'Estimauville Avenue
Québec QC G1J 0C3
Telephone: 418-648-4663
Email: ec.permislepqc-sarapermittingqc.ec@canada.ca

Ontario Region

Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
335 River Road
Ottawa ON K1V 1C7
Telephone: 613-990-8355
Fax: 613-990-8400
Email: ec.permislepqc-sarapermittingqc.ec@canada.ca

For more information on permits for aquatic species at risk, please contact Fisheries and Oceans Canada:

Fish and Fish Habitat Protection Program
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
850 route de la Mer
P.O. Box 1000
Mont-Joli QC G5H 3Z4
Fax: 418-775-0658
Telephone: 1-877-722-4828
Email: habitat-qc@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

4.4 Licences for Explosive Factories and Magazines under subsection 7(1) of the Explosives Act

4.4.1 Description

These licences and certificates are the responsibility of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan).

Under section 6 of the Explosives Act, it is prohibited to make or manufacture any explosive, either wholly or in part, except in a licenced factory or to store any explosive in a magazine that is not a licenced magazine. Under paragraph 7(1)(a), however, the Minister of Natural Resources may issue licences for factories and magazines.

The Minister may make any licence, permit or certificate referred to in subsection (1) subject to any term or condition, in addition to those prescribed by the regulations, that the Minister considers necessary for the safety of any person or property, including, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, compliance with security or safety standards in respect of any factory or magazine or any class thereof that are supplementary to but not inconsistent with those provided for under paragraph 5(g.1).

To produce explosives and have bulk explosives delivered, a company must operate under either a licence or a certificate. Depending on a project's explosives supply requirements and, in some cases, the proximity of existing licenced factories, an explosive supplier may apply for Division 1 factory licences (factory with or without a wash bay) or Division 2 manufacturing certificates. Part 5 of the Explosives Regulations, 2013 indicates how to obtain a factory licence or manufacturing certificate and sets out the requirements for manufacturing explosives and how ‘manufacturing' is defined.

With respect to the project, the detailed project description as submitted to the Agency does not appear to require the issuance of licences for explosive factories and magazines for the proponent. If any modifications to the project would result in the need for licences, NRCan would provide the required licences as prescribed by the Act within a reasonable period of time.

4.4.2 Regulatory Process

4.4.2.1 Application Submission

Companies or individuals needing a licence for explosive factories and magazines may submit a request to NRCan's Explosives Regulatory Division.

4.4.2.2 Application Analysis and Indigenous Consultation

Once the application has been received, NRCan will review it to ensure that all required information is included. Considering the limited environmental impacts and the strictness of the legal process with respect to explosive factories and magazines, Indigenous consultation may be limited.

4.4.2.3 Regulatory Decision

NRCan issues factory licences (with or without a wash bay) within 60 days following receipt of a complete application or, for certificates and other licences, within 30 days.

4.4.3 References

Explosives Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. E-17
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/E-17/index.html

Explosives Regulations, 2013 (SOR/2013-211)
https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2013-211/page-1.html

Application Forms for Licences and Certificates
https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/maps-tools-publications/publications/explosives-publications/explosives-forms/9939#li1

Guidelines for Bulk Explosives Facilities
https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/explosives/resources/guidelines/9925

4.4.4 Contact Information

For more detailed guidance, please contact the NRCan's Explosives Regulatory Division in Ottawa.

Explosives Regulatory Division
Explosives Safety and Security Branch
Natural Resources Canada
Ottawa ON K1A 0E4
Email: NRCan.erd_central_region_centrale_dre.RNCan@canada.ca

5. Interpretation

This permitting plan is not a legal document and does not change any existing federal, provincial, or Indigenous legislative or regulatory jurisdiction, right, power, privilege, prerogative or immunity by virtue, nor does it create any new legal powers, duties or legally binding obligations.

6. Contact Information

The Agency office designated for administering the impact assessment of the project is:

Impact Assessment Agency of Canada – Gazoduq Project
160 Elgin Street, 22nd Floor, Ottawa ON K1A 0H3
Telephone: 613-222-3507
Email: iaac.gazoduq.aeic@canada.ca

Date modified: